Women's Work in the Long 19th Century

 

Representing Native-American Women--Works Cited

 

 

“Aunt Dinah.”  Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Magazine.  June 8, 1883: 257.

 

Berkhofer, Robert F., Jr.  The White Man’s Indian:  Images of the American Indian from Columbus to the Present.  New York:  Alfred A. Knopf, 1978.

 

Charles, Jim.  “For the Sake of a Fad:  The Misrepresentation of American Indians and Their Literature in High School Literature Anthologies.”  Journal of Ethnic Studies 15 (1987):  131-140.

 

“A Contrast Illustrating Indian Progress.” Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Magazine. March 26, 1887: 85.

 

Coward, John M.  The Newspaper Indian, Native American Identity in the Press, 1820-90.  Urbana:  University of Illinois Press, 1999.

 

Deloria, Jr., Vine. Custer Died for Your Sins.  Norman:  University of Oklahoma Press, 1988.

 

________.  Red Earth, White Lies.  New York:  Scribner, 1995.

 

Edgerton, Gary.  “A Breed Apart:  Hollywood, Racial Stereotyping, and the Promise of Revisionism in The Last of the Mohicans.”  Journal of American Culture 17.2 (1994): 1.

 

Green, Rayna.  “The Pocahontas Perplex:  The Image of Indian Women in American Culture.”  Unequal Sisters:  A Multicultural Reader in U.S. Woman’s History.  Ed.  Ellen Carol DuBois and Vicki L. Ruiz.  New York:  Routledge, 1991.  15-21.

 

Hauptman, Laurence M.  Tribes and Tribulations:  Misconceptions About American Indians and Their Histories.  Albuquerque:  University of New Mexico Press, 1995.

 

“Huera, Instigator of the Apache Outbreak.”  Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Magazine. July 31, 1886: 380.

 

“The Indian Training School at Carlisle, Pa.” Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Magazine. March 15, 1884: 59.

 

Jackson, Helen Hunt. A Century of Dishonor: A Sketch of the United States Government's Dealings with some of the Indian Tribes (New York: Harper, 1881).

 

Landis, Barbara.  Carlisle Indian Industrial School History.  1996.  http://home.epix.net/~landis/histry.html

 

Macdonald, Fiona.  Women in the 19th Century America.  New York:  Peter Bedrick Books, 1999.

 

Mieder, Wolfgang.  “The Only Good Indian is a Dead Indian:  History and Meaning of a Proverbial Stereotype.”  Journal of American Folklore 106 (1993):  38-60. 

 

Mihesuah, Devon A. Cultivating the Rosebuds:  The Education of Women at the Cherokee Female Seminary, 1851-1909.  Urbana and Chicago:  University of Illinois Press, 1993.

 

Trennert, Robert A.  “Educating Indian Girls at Nonreservation Boarding Schools, 1878-1920.”  Unequal Sisters:  A Multicultural Reader in U.S. Woman’s History.  Ed.  Ellen Carol DuBois and Vicki L. Ruiz.  New York:  Routledge, 1991, 224-237.

 

Wexler, Laura.  Tender Violence. Chapel Hill:  University of North Carolina Press, 2000.

 

 

Representing Native-American Women--Image Citations

 

Frank Leslie’s. “A Suggestive Contrast – The Indian in the Wild and in the Civilized State – Miss Kitty Ross, Daughter of a Leading Official of the Cherokee Nation.” The Library Company of Philadelphia, Philadelphia.  March 26, 1887, p. 85.

**Per L

 

Frank Leslie’s. “Educating the Indians...”.. The Library Company of Philadelphia, Philadelphia. March 15, 1884. Page 56-7. Scenes at the Government Training School at Carlisle, PA. 

**Per L

The dawn of civilization --an Indian belle at her toilet.

 

Frank Leslie’s. “Aunt Dinah.”  The Library Company of Philadelphia, Philadelphia. June 9, 1883, p. 257.

**Per L

 

Bean & Brother.  “Indian Queen Perfume.” The Library Company of Philadelphia, Philadelphia. 1975.F.130 (Advertising Card).

 

Frank Leslie’s. “Huera, Wife of the Indian Chief Mangus, and Reported Instigator of the Apache Outbreak”. July 31, 1886. p. 380.

**Per L